Organic matter transformation and porosity development in non-reclaimed mining soils of different ages and vegetation covers: a field study of soils of the zinc and lead ore area in SE Poland
PBN-AR
Instytucja
Wydział Rolniczo-Ekonomiczny (Uniwersytet Rolniczy im. Hugona Kołłątaja w Krakowie)
Informacje podstawowe
Główny język publikacji
en
Czasopismo
Journal of Soils and Sediments (30pkt w roku publikacji)
ISSN
1439-0108
EISSN
Wydawca
DOI
URL
Rok publikacji
2017
Numer zeszytu
17
Strony od-do
2066-2079
Numer tomu
Identyfikator DOI
Liczba arkuszy
0.65
Autorzy
(liczba autorów: 1)
Słowa kluczowe
en
Chronosequence
Heavy metal pollution
Micromorphological analysis
Plant residues decomposition
Porosity
Post-mining soils
Streszczenia
Język
en
Treść
Purpose Plant residue decomposition, porosity status and biological activity in heavily polluted with Zn, Pb and Cd post-mining soils were investigated in relation to natural soil in the area. The study was carried out on soils from different ages and vegetation cover. This work aimed at studying the influence of heavy metal concentration on the humus layer formation with the help of micromorphological methods. Materials and methods Soil samples were collected from 5 sites situated in the Zn and Pb mining area and from one site located in the vicinity but unchanged by mining works. In each site, a representative area of about 100 m2 was selected and soil samples from 5 randomly selected plots were taken from surface and subsurface layers. Chemical, micromorphological and biological analyses were conducted in order to evaluate humus transformations occurring in studied soils and to establish the main factors affecting these processes. In images taken from thin sections, we separated and measured areas covered by decomposed organic matter, plant residues and pores. Results and discussion Mine soils had similar pH soil values (6.7–7.1); only one natural soil was moderately acid (pH = 5.6). The soils differed in SOM content, from 30.84 to 168 g kg−1. Mine soils were contaminated with heavy metals up to 10,980 mg Zn, 5436 mg Pb and 95.2 mg Cd·kg−1. The largest amount of the medium-sized and large plant residues (18.4 and 20.5%) were found in post-mining soil covered with xerothermic flora typical of metalliferous areas. The lowest amount of small residues was found in post-mining forest soil. The diversified accumulation of plant residues reflected the organic matter decomposition ratio varying from 1.64 (post-mining soil 15% covered with calamine flora) to 62.7% (natural soil covered with forest). In the natural soil, rounded pores prevailed, while in post-mining soils, planar pores dominated. Invertase activity ranged from 1.64 to 154.2 mg of inverted sugar, and carbon of microbial biomass ranged from 5.94 to 731.2 μg g−1. Both characteristics were related to the amount of organic matter regardless of the heavy-metal pollution. Conclusions The results showed that a decomposition ratio was lower in mining soils than in the natural soil, and large plant residues were accumulated in surface layers. Microbial activity was more influenced by plant cover density and diversity than by heavy metal concentration. The evolution in the organic matter form and pore shapes with the soil age and the vegetation cover was observed.
Inne
System-identifier
UR7aa5624e61164623a31a5d2333851cab
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